November 8, 2022 Total Lunar Eclipse: Visibility Map

  • Released Wednesday, September 28th, 2022
  • Updated Wednesday, November 15th, 2023 at 12:18AM
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Also see the shadow diagram and Dial-a-Moon for this eclipse.

On November 8, 2022, the Moon enters the Earth's shadow, creating a total lunar eclipse, the first since May. This animation shows the region of the Earth where this eclipse is visible. This region shifts to the west during the eclipse. Observers near the edge of the visibility region may see only part of the eclipse because for them, the Moon sets (on the eastern or right-hand edge) or rises (on the western or left-hand edge) while the eclipse is happening.

Contour lines mark the edge of the visibility region at the contact times. These are the times when the Moon enters or leaves the umbra (the part of the Earth's shadow where the Sun is completely hidden) and penumbra (the part where the Sun is only partially blocked). For observers located on a contour line, the contact occurs at moonrise (west) or moonset (east).

A map showing where the November 8, 2022 lunar eclipse is visible. Contours mark the edge of the visibility region at eclipse contact times. The map is centered on 168°57'W, the sublunar longitude at mid-eclipse.

A map showing where the November 8, 2022 lunar eclipse is visible. Contours mark the edge of the visibility region at eclipse contact times. The map is centered on 168°57'W, the sublunar longitude at mid-eclipse.



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NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio


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