Jupiter's Hot Spots

  • Released Thursday, March 14th, 2013
  • Updated Wednesday, May 3rd, 2023 at 1:52PM
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Jupiter's bright Equatorial Zone swirls with dark patches, dubbed "hot spots" for their infrared glow. These holes in the ammonia clouds at the top of the atmosphere allow a glimpse into Jupiter's darker, hotter layers below. In 1995 NASA's Galileo spacecraft dropped a probe directly into a hot spot, taking the first and only in situ measurements of Jupiter's atmosphere. Now, movies recorded by NASA's Cassini spacecraft reveal that hot spots are not just local weather phenomena, but are in fact linked to much larger-scale atmospheric structures called Rossby waves.

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NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and Cassini Mission Team, NASA JPL


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  • Jupiter's Hot Spots (ID: 2012099)
    Thursday, March 14, 2013 at 4:00AM
    Produced by - Dan Jacob

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